It’s not a race…

I haven’t been around here much lately, in fact, it’s more like ‘The neglected nest’ at this point. It wasn’t intentional, it’s just that I’ve been doing far too much.

I am exhausted.

If I have no other skills, I’m absolutely fantastic at burning the candle at both ends. It never ends well and despite the fact that I know it’s coming every time I still keep driving myself through it until I crash completely and end up sick.

It’s something I’ve always done through school, university and now adult life. Since the start of the year I’ve been working on so many different things around my 9-5 job amongst a few extra stresses and every Monday I’ve gotten up and put on my ‘it’s go-time’ attitude.

This week is a little different, this week I’m reminding myself to slow down. It’s not a race, I’m not competing against anyone. I’m not going to beat myself up because I didn’t get my Etsy shop restocked and tidied up this weekend. I don’t need the ‘house’ (well… you know what I mean be now) to be cleaned by tonight. My to-do lists can wait. I don’t need to do everything NOW.

It includes bigger things too- I want to go back to university and do a Masters degree in music, build a house, get a new car, do a violin diploma, become a full-time violin teacher and have kids… but I really, REALLY don’t need to do everything by the time I’m 30, and it would probably shock you if you knew how often I started to worry over all these things because I think I should have done it by now. Comparison often sneaks quietly into our lives and sets unrealistic goals that we don’t even notice until we’re disappointed and worn out. What’s the point in fretting at night because the to-do list for the day isn’t completed, when it only makes us more weary for the next day? We put too much pressure on ourselves to be where someone else is and although we may have planned it for ourselves, it doesn’t always work out that way.

Here’s my challenge for both myself and for you this week: SLOW DOWN. Ignore the dishes and enjoy your cup of tea. Run a hot bubble bath, and hop in with a good book. Watch a movie, play with your kids (if you have them), go for a walk, try a Pinterest craft. Even just go to bed early and don’t beat yourself up for it in the morning when you see what you ‘should’ have been doing. You’ll not get anything done if you’ve run yourself into the ground and haven’t taken time to look after yourself.

So, how are you going to take some time for yourself this week?

Gillian x

Keeping it Personal… {Shopping}

After I left university my first full-time job was in a diamond jewellers. I mean my degree is in music, so it was an obvious choice. I can’t lie and say I loved the job (it’s actually very stressful!) but I would also be lying if I said I didn’t love working with jewellery all day – bracelets, necklaces, earrings, watches and diamond rings… oh, the diamond rings.

(I think I could go back to working with diamonds.)

The job suited me because I’m a total magpie when it comes to jewellery of any sort, so I couldn’t help but notice a bit of a trend for name necklaces lately. Jennifer Hudson (what a gal) was sporting dainty little gold ‘Jennifer’ necklace on The Voice, and if it’s good enough for J-Hud, it’s good enough for me! (If I could have her singing voice too, that would be great.)

It turns out that a name like ‘Gillian’ isn’t that easy to find on necklaces (or coasters, keyrings, pens, etc…) so I love it when a company offers customisation. Ineffabless London offer gorgeous sterling silver pieces (they’re marked 925, I checked) as well as yellow gold and rose gold plated pieces – and they’re completely customisable! Each personalised name necklace is made to order; simply select your favourite design and enter anything up to 13 characters to personalise it. You can see how your name will look in their font with the preview too. I chose the name necklace in silver, linked here.

Of course the magpie in me struck again and I fell for a 2 bar-pendant necklace (again in silver, because I mostly wear silver) and got it engraved with my husband’s name and my own – a great idea if you have kids and want to keep their names close to your heart. You can find this piece here. Both necklaces are dainty and pretty, and both were reasonably priced – that’s my kind of jewellery.

Gillian x

P.S. It pains me to say it, but Valentine’s Day isn’t far away… it might be a good idea, guys 😉

Happy New Year!

I don’t normally like New Year’s Day. I just find it too depressing- the sparkle is quite literally gone. As is the chocolate. No more twinkly lights, no more cosy (if unfashionable) Christmas jumpers, no more mince pies and even Michael Bublé retreats back to the North Pole for another 11 months. I don’t make resolutions either- I’ve never kept them when I have in the past, and then I write myself off for another year. I’d rather accept my screw-ups and take each new day as it comes.

I get so upset that my favourite season is passed and is as far away again as it can be… but this year is a little different. I’m still feeling the post-Christmas blues, but I actually feel excited as well. Back in July when I started this little blog I spent weeks puzzling over what I should call it. It was right at a time when we were leaving the rented house that we had called home, but had never really felt like home, and I was worried that we would be moving into our mobile a little more permanently than I’d like.

During that time a song lyric keep playing in my mind: “His eye is on the sparrow, and I know He watches me”. Over and over, it just kept going, day and night, and it reminded me of Matthew 6:26: “Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not much more valuable than they?” God gives the birds- little sparrows, the most invaluble of all, everything they need, and He will give me everything I need, and what I’ve needed since then is a house.

I don’t want anything particularly grand (although, if you saw my secret Pinterest boards, you might not believe me on that one- hey, if I end up in a mansion I’m not going to complain!) and the reality that we may not be able to get planning permission to build our forever home is setting in. We’ve had planners, architects, consultants, 2nd opinions, 3rd opinions and 4th opinions… and we’ve only a few tricks left up our sleeve. Whilst we’re not ever going to completely give up on our dream to build (because realistically, the planning office change their rules daily) we know we might have to buy a house and make it our own, at least for now!

As gutted as we will be if we can’t ever build our own home, we’re still SO excited at the thought of buying a house and making it ours- I can’t wait! So whilst we have a lot (and I mean, a lot) of work to do, our goal (not a resolution!) for 2018 is either planning permission, or buying our first home… and I’ve been all over the Laura Ashley website for inspiration. Just in case.

We have no idea where 2018 might lead, we have no idea if a house will come up for us, or if we will get granted permission, but I’m looking forward to keeping you updated on the way!

Gillian x

“That’s it for another year.”

29D1772F-EE05-4EE3-AB98-5983ED555A96.jpegThere’s always one. One person who gets up and announces at about 9pm on Christmas Day: “Well, that’s it for another year!”. It’s usually Dad.

Thank you, Captain Obvious.

I remember Dad putting me to bed one Christmas when I was little (probably around 7 but I can’t remember that well). He tucked me in surrounded by my new toys from Santa, stood up and said those words: “That’s it all over for another year.” Being the sassy little so-and-so that I was (some might say argumentative… some might say I still am) I turned round and said “No, it’s not Daddy, we still have everyone coming for dinner tomorrow.” He laughed, and said I was right as he left the room.

(Of course I was right. I’m always right. Nearly.)

The thing is, it doesn’t have to all be over for another year. Okay, we don’t have the whole Santa and present thing to deal with everyday, but what about everything else?

The cheery greetings to everyone we pass,  the family dinner at an actual, real life table, the spirit of thankfulness and giving, the willingness to help another in need, the generosity towards charity- why are these only for Christmas?

If you’ve ever read or watched Charles Dickens’ famous tale ‘A Christmas Carol’ you’ll know Scrooge was one mean-spirited, grumpy, tight-fisted, old badger of a man. (Plot spoiler coming up here… although if you haven’t read the book, I don’t know how you couldn’t have seen at least one of the 738426 movie adaptions). He hates Christmas and everything it stands for, but by the end of the story he makes a vow: “I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year.”

By January, we’ve loved Christmas, over-indulged in it even… but forget to keep it with us throughout the year. We might not be as grumpy and mean-spirited as the former Scrooge, but we lose the smiles, thankfulness, generosity, even the proper ‘family time’. It’s like we tick the box in December and that’ll do us until we need to top it up again in 12 months’ time.

I’m not a ‘New Year’s Resolution’ type of girl, but wouldn’t it be nice if we could all resolve to spend the next year with the spirit of Christmas in our hearts- smiling at strangers, being thankful and giving, helping the more vulnerable people in our society, or even just putting the phones down and having good, old-fashioned conversation with family over dinner at the table.

I’ll probably need reminded again and again to wipe the frown off my face and cheer up. I’ll probably be in a bad mood and not say “thank you”, because I don’t feel like it. I’ll probably avoid people collecting for charities who do valuable work, because I’d rather spend my change on a wispa. I’ll probably walk past a homeless person, or a little old man who’s struggling to find the change he needs in his wallet, because I’m in a hurry. I’ll probably even lift my phone out and start flicking through Instagram over dinner, because I can’t be bothered telling anyone about my mundane day, or listening to them talk about theirs.


But I’m going to try to honour Christmas in my heart, and keep it all the year.

Gillian x

Winter Garland {Collab}

Recently I was approached by the lovely girls of Your World Blog to do a collaboration. These three gorgeous young ladies encourage having a voice and making it heard, loving and looking after the world around us and creativity, which is something big, sad adults need a little encouraging in sometimes. They each post a new blog on Sundays, and reading them is like sitting down and having a good, honest chat with an old friend. They share their own thoughts, ideas and influences, and spread a little bit of much needed sunshine and positivity.

To be honest, I haven’t done a collaboration before, so hadn’t a clue as to what to suggest, but after taking a look through the girls’ blog we thought it would be fun to give the old ‘DIY Autumn Garland‘ a festive revamp for them to try and get others involved with too.

It’s pretty much the same process, using the same natural products, but just for Christmas I’ve added in a little decoration and of course, glitter.

You will need:

– 2-3 large oranges (depending on how long you want your garland to be)
– Greaseproof paper, a baking tray and a sharp knife
– Cinnamon sticks
– Twigs/pine branches/pine cones/ anything you can find!
– Twine

– Glitter
– Glue
– Miniature baubles/Christmas decorations (mine are little, white, wooden stars from Sostrene Grene, but supermarkets, Home Bargains, B&M bargains, Primark etc would have something you could use).

Slice the oranges about 2mm thick and pop them onto a baking tray on greaseproof before putting them into the oven at 50-70°C for four hours, turning them about halfway through this time. Once cooled, pass a short length of twine through each slice and tie a knot, leaving a loop to attach the orange slice to the garland.

Bind a couple of bunches of 2/3 cinnamon sticks tightly with twine, leaving a gap or loop that you can pass the twine for the garland through.

Cut the twine to your desired garland length, leaving a little extra for the knots you will be tying along it. Lay out your pine branches, pine cones, orange slices and cinnamon stick bunches as desired – here you can add any little baubles or decorations to your arrangement. Thread the twine through the loops on the orange slices and cinnamon stick bunches and tie a knot before moving on. For pine cones and pine branches wrap the twine around a couple of times and tie a tight knot.

If you like a little bit of sparkle, spread a little bit of glue over parts of your garland and sprinkle with glitter. Allow to dry and hang up your festive garland for everyone to see!


I love a little bit of sparkle (actually, I love a lot of sparkle, but I do try to control myself), so I added some red glitter to the red twigs I foraged from a plant in the garden.

To find out how Tea and a Read is getting on with her garland, go and read her latest blog post on Your World Blog, linked here. You can also follow them on Instagram @yourworldblog. We’d love to see you give it a go and share it with us- why not try your own festive garland and share it with us via instagram, using the hashtag #createwithgillandtea!

Happy Christmas crafting!

Gillian x

Bonnie Edinburgh

If you follow on me on Instagram, you will have noticed we recently had a trip to Edinburgh, Scotland, for our second wedding anniversary (well, that was the excuse anyway). You may have guessed by the title of this post, but just to make myself completely clear: I LOVE Edinburgh. I mean, I really LOVE Edinburgh.


We had heard so much about the wonderful Edinburgh Christmas markets that we made it our mission to go – and we weren’t disappointed. Never ones to miss an opportunity, we made what could have been an overnight stay into a long weekend break and spent our four days there walking the length and breadth of the city… after our four hour nap upon arrival.

We hadn’t seen each other long enough since our trip to Paris to sit down and book accommodation, so we booked a fantastic Aparthotel (I didn’t know this was a ‘thing’… FYI, they’re serviced apartments) on the way to the airport at 7am. Although I would not recommend booking quite so late, it worked out very well for us and we had a small kitchen and eating area, a king size bed and a massive shower in our apartment- 20 minutes walk from everywhere! Being in the Fountain Bridge area of the city, Edinburgh’s famous aroma greeted us as we neared the street our apartment was on – the warm smell of hops crept around the streets, and in a really strange way (because to be frank about it, it kind of smells like warm dog food), I liked it.

As the Christmas markets were the reason we went to Edinburgh we visited a few times (basically, if I got hungry, we trotted off to the markets for burgers, crepes, bratwurst – all the good stuff). We meandered through the stalls and found the secret word in the maze of ‘Santaland’, but we soon found ourselves wandering away from the markets and into tiny, crooked streets leading to cobbled roads and antique buildings. Dark as it was, before we knew it we’d come to the castle gates and were excited to explore the city lit up before us in daylight.


I’m a very nostalgic person, and although we’d decided only to do free things in the city (which there is a lot of), I couldn’t resist a day in the castle learning about it’s history and everything it had seen. Every building told part of the castle’s long and colourful history dating as far backs as the 1100s. Between the castle and the Royal Mile, my imagination ran wild with the possible stories of the people who had stood on the same cobbles hundreds of years before.

What really struck us was how much the locals knew about Edinburgh’s history, and if they didn’t know they had a book or resources to access the information we asked for at hand. They were so happy to chat and share what they knew- everyone took true pride in their city, their history and their culture.

Curious about our own history I asked about the ‘Bells of the Borders’, as Granda had called us that when we mentioned Scotland… lower class bell ringers, who were so poor they didn’t have a clan motto, crest or their own tartan for a long time, because they weren’t important enough to need it. The Corbetts couldn’t be a story farther from the poor Bells- a sept of the mighty highland Ross clan they were pretty much nobility and had estates and a castle. A flipping castle. Paddy now insists that I married up.

Anyway, leaving that discussion for another day… we took a different direction the next morning and went to the Grassmarket which leads round to Greyfriar’s Bobby. Somehow we managed to walk from there to Duddingston Loch, half way up Arthur’s Seat and all the way around to Holyrood Palace. Again, we hadn’t planned a visit but I couldn’t resist – I mostly just wanted to see how the Queen had the place decorated for Christmas. (In all fairness, it was nothing fancier than what I’ve seen in M&S recently.)


Just like Edinburgh Castle at the opposite end of the Royal Mile, the palace was filled with tales of days long since past (and the Queen’s crockery, they know how to do a decent dinner setting) – everything from Queen Victoria’s tapestries to locks of ‘Bonnie Prince Charlie’s hair. It’s hard to believe some of the 400 year old items have been around for so long- the evidence of true craftsmanship. Oh, how we have lost so many skills by allowing machines to make everything for us.

We decided our ‘anniversary dinner’ should be a truly authentic Scottish meal, so we walked back to the Grassmarket to find the ‘real thing’. Where better to go than the (potentially) oldest pub in Edinburgh – The White Hart Inn? I have to be completely honest… it smells a bit… actually, it has a fairly potent stench. I don’t frequent pubs often but I can guess that some of it is just spilt booze, and given that parts of the building have been standing since 1516, you can forgive it for absorbing a few odours over the years. We ticked our authentic Scottish food box with ‘Haggis, Neeps and Tatties’. It was surprisingly good… but I think I still prefer Scottish smoked salmon.


Unlike our recent trip to Paris (which you can read about here), we found we didn’t really want to go home. There was so much of the city we hadn’t yet seen and so many people we hadn’t yet spoken to. It’s a city where the past and present live in perfect harmony, and each street and doorway seems to tell it’s part of the story of what happened along the way. If you’ve never been to Edinburgh, do yourself the favour and book a trip… and bring your thermals. We’ll be back just as soon as we can manage it!

Gillian x




2 Years and counting…

I can’t believe we’ve been married for 2 years.

2 years.

And now I’m on bridesmaid duties for my little sister!

Where does the time go? If you’d asked me 2 years ago where I thought we’d be now… it probably wouldn’t have been living in a mobile home in my parent’s garden with a sassy pomeranian. That’s just it though- we can plan all we want but it might not work out as we expect it to, and our wedding pretty much went that way too.

About 10 weeks before our wedding date my lovely Granda was diagnosed with a brain tumour – the third time in his life that he’d had cancer, and although he’d beaten it before, deep down we all knew what it meant. So the wedding was off, then it was on, then it was off, then it was on…off, on, off, on, off… and finally we sat down with Nanny and asked what we should do, because literally no-one could give us an answer. She told us Granda wouldn’t have wanted us to postpone the wedding and to go ahead, twelve short days after he passed away in the wonderful Southern Area Hospice.

The next morning was weird. All of a sudden there were no more hospital visits, no more days in the hospice, no more visitors trailing constantly through the door and we had to get into wedding mode. We had to get excited, or at least try. My plan all along had been to make a lot of things by hand myself and whilst I’d been futtering (footering? How do we spell that one?) at what I could, there was still a lot to do and it was a bit of a scramble to get to all together.

We wanted a wedding that was sparky and festive but, as per usual,  we didn’t want it to break the bank, and somehow we achieved it, despite it all. It was strange day without Granda, but we managed to enjoy it and find ways to honour his memory, including a collection for the hospice that looked after him so carefully.

My dress was a sample dress- originally a £1400 strapless fishtail that I had altered to a fit and flare with a boatneck top and sheer sleeves, and the bridesmaid dresses came from eBay, collectively costing about half the original price of my dress. I didn’t go looking for a sample sale, but I was chuffed at finding my dress that way.

The week before the wedding saw many 2am bedtimes (so much for ‘beauty sleep’ before the big day) as I sat making the crocheted flower hairpieces and assembling the bouquets for bridesmaids and flower girls from the bags of white crochet flowers my aunt had been helping me with. I wanted something unique for my bouquet so made it entirely from roses that I crocheted myself, with lace, pearls and angelina fibres woven through it- and I still love it.


Paddy and I had gone down to our church the day before and decorated it with holly and ivy around the front steps, tea lights in jam jars decorated with silver bells on the window sills and baby’s breath sprayed with sparkling, silver glitter held on the end of each pew by a floaty white organza bow.

Our reception was held at The Mill at Ballydugan, a beautifully renovated old 18th century mill, with rustic stone walls and low wooden beams. We had little to do to get the look we wanted as they had already decorated with Christmas trees and garlands, but we made our mark with DIY centre pieces (glittery baby’s breath in a jar of diamonte and glitter water, sitting on a log slice surrounded by tea lights),  our seating plan was a 4ft tree (featuring Santa and his reindeer) and our favours were little personalised wooden decorations.

The biggest hand-made hurdle of all was the cake; with the help of a talented friend, it too was homemade. We spent 13 and a half pain-staking hours, baking, icing and decorating our wedding cake. If you take nothing else from this post, remember this: never, ever make your own wedding cake. It might seem like a good idea at the time, but nothing is worth that level of stress. And then you realise you have to transport the thing.


Our wedding wasn’t exactly cheap as chips, but it wasn’t the £20,000-£50,000 extravaganza that weddings can be, and we still have lots of the little bits and pieces we made for the wedding floating about the house (well… mobile… you get the drift). How many brides can say they still have their wedding bouquet sitting in their living room? It was lots of hard work, stress, tears and a couple of tantrums but it was so completely worth it to say we made our day ourselves.  Strangely enough, we’re just as married, and just as happy as everyone who spent 5 times the amount we did, and we wouldn’t have had it any other way.

It was a weird, exciting, sad, happy, joy-filled, tear-filled, LOVE-filled day that we’ll always cherish.

Gillian x

P.S. If you make a charitable donation at Christmas, please consider a local hospice – they help the families through difficult times as much as they do patients.